Hibiscus beauty, a new painting

hibiscus
Hibiscus beauty, 32″x32″, acrylic on canvas, © 2017 Donna Grandin. $1400.

A new Hibiscus painting

In 2010 I painted & exhibited a series of acrylic paintings I called Hibiscus ‘n Banana. Every now & then I return to paint another hibiscus. Instead of trying to paint the most perfect flower, I’m like a portrait painter striving to pull out what is unique in each subject. The beauty is in the variations.

Thanks to my cousin, Patrice Esper for letting me use her photo of a an orange hibiscus as reference for the painting. I very rarely paint from someone else’s photos, but the lighting on the hibiscus was so beautiful. I started to paint it in my head as soon as I saw it.

In the interim

There were many months between the start and finish of this painting, and between this post and my last. A variety of projects & distractions took me away, and the truth is, I’m not sure if it’s worth the time to blog anymore. I’ve been posting work-in-progress photos on Instagram, as well as other things that inspire me, and this “micro-blogging” is much more immediate, less time-consuming.

This summer I took the family to St. Lucia for a month, and it was an epic trip – first time my parents, my brother & his wife, my husband & our boys, and even my mother-in-law were in the same country at the same time. So we crammed as much into that trip as we could, and some of the highlights were climbing Gros Piton, Carnival, seeing an octopus while snorkeling, volcanic mud bath, and standing under a waterfall, hanging out with family & friends, having a pop-up art sale at The Inner Gallery. Then I did a 2 day side-trip to Barbados to deliver paintings to Gallery of Caribbean Art for CariFestArt, an exhibition of artists from 11 Caribbean islands, a fringe event of Carifesta.

I also took many wonderful reference photos, and I’m looking forward to painting some of them for a solo show (more on that another day).

Hurricanes

The Caribbean is going through a terrible hurricane season right now, with lives lost or completely uprooted, and extensive damage to property.  As part of the Caribbean diaspora, I would like to help, and I was thinking of creating prints of Hibiscus beauty, and donating a percentage of proceeds towards hurricane relief efforts. Before I go that route though, I’d like to get some feedback, so please e-mail donna@bluerootsartstudio.com to let me know if you’d be interested.

 

 

 

Official Launch of Arts and Culture Council of Burlington

ACCOB Launch
Official Launch of Arts & Culture Council of Burlington.

So much to tell, so little time before the official launch.

About last weekend …

I’d barely caught up on my sleep from the double event last Sat – temp Public Art installation at the Burlington Public Library, and live painting/art market/tea sampling at Be Yoga & Wellness – when I had to jump back into my volunteer work for ACCOB. And while I was preparing for all of that, I was also helping co-ordinate a show of my work at Buzz Restaurant in St. Lucia., AND have a family life.

So, right now, I’m trying to do follow up (more in a later blog post), as well as try to take some time for self-care. My eyes have been fuzzy lately, so I need to make a point of getting more sleep and spending less time on computer, then hopefully when I retake the eye tests in 2 weeks there will be better results.

Of course, I still have to do my taxes, and write an article – an athlete profile of a National Tumbler – for the Oakville Gymnastics Club Fast Track Newsletter. And there is the big family trip to St. Lucia to plan.

Meanwhile, there is a lovely hibiscus painting on the easel calling my name …

What was I writing about anyway?

ACCOB Launch

Ah yes, if you are in the Burlington area, we would love to see you at the official opening launch of the Arts & Culture Council of Burlington on April 18th.

I have been going to meetings that have led to this outcome, for almost 5 years! There have been many ups and downs, and I’m happy to have met so many great people in the local Arts Community throughout this process. I am proud to be on the board of directors, having served first on the External Body Sub-Committee of the Cultural Action Plan Implementation Committee. 

And I am also Membership Chair, so I’ve been setting up the system to receive new members, and have been reaching out to local businesses who will be offering discounts to ACCOB members. It’s just a start, but it has taken a lot of work to get here.

I look forward to being part of ACCOB as it continues to grow into its potential.

 

 

 

 

 

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Art installation, art market and tea sampling

Be Yoga art opening
Live painting, art market & tea sampling  

I have 2 events happening in Burlington this Sat. So it’s going to be a busy day. First I’ll be setting up an art installation at Burlington Central Library on New Street, then I’ll be heading to Be Yoga and Wellness at Fairview & Walkers.

There I will be setting up a table with small paintings (some never been shown before) & greeting cards, and fellow artist Heather Horton will be painting live. Both of us have art on display on the walls of Be Yoga as part of an on-going display (we switch out the paintings now and then).

Also, looking forward to the tea sampling, and meeting Katie from The Monarch Tea Co.

Art Installation

Then at 1pm I’ll pack up and head back to the library. I hope to be there from 1:30-4pm for the rest of the Lost in Books event. Then it’ll be time to pack up.

art installation
Lost in Books, art installation event.

I hope you will get a chance to see my installation, called Night Garden … you’ll have to use a flashlight, to see my paintings on the stage. It’s quite an interesting effect, best experienced in person.

 

 

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Ontario apples, live painting at Culture Days

Ontario apples
Ontario apples, 20″x16″, acrylic on canvas, © 2016 Donna Grandin. $600.

Ontario Apples

Recently I went to Frootogo Farm in Waterdown to pick fresh Ontario apples. It has become a family tradition ever since we had kids, to visit a nearby farm in the fall. There is just something so cute about photographing toddlers surrounded by bright orange pumpkins bigger than they are! And it is a great way to visually mark time, as the kids in the photos get bigger each year.

Springridge and Frootogo are the two local farms that we have been to most often, but for apple picking we have to go to the latter. And that is where I got the reference photos for this painting.

live painting
Donna Grandin painting live at Culture Days 2016 in Civic Square, in front of Burlington City Hall.

Culture Days

I participated in Culture Days Burlington on Oct 1st, 2016, in Civic Square which is just in front of the Burlington City Hall. This year I was one of the artists selected to perform for an honorarium. I was not part of the Art Market, in that I did not have items for sale, but instead I painted live.

This photo shows the painting in progress, near the end of the event. I painted for 3 hours, my hope was that I would have it finished in time to do a silent auction, and that I would donate the proceeds to the Arts and Culture Council of Burlington, but I was still painting when some of the artists were packing away their booths.

I am happy with how much I got done in that short time, but instead of leaving it as a study, I decided to refine and complete it in my studio over the next week.

Live Painting

Painting with a live audience is not as scary as you might expect it to be, because quite frankly the nature of painting on a deadline is that you have to be in the moment as you focus on the immediate painting decisions. When people come up and talk to you, or there is live music and hustle and bustle around you,  it all adds to the vibe – the energy that you absorb unconsciously,  and then reflect in the art.

When you paint intuitively, you slip into a creative zone, and that crowds out any self-doubt about whether you will be able to pull off a good painting. Or worries that people will be seeing your painting as it goes through the inevitable ugly stages. In fact, people generally come up to you with positive things to say.

Every time I am hired to paint live, it is a memorable event for me, and for the audience who gets to see my painting process in person. So far, the feedback has been very positive, so I look forward to doing it again!

This painting will be on display in studio #7 during the Art in Action Burlington Studio Tour Nov 5 &6, 10-5pm, unless you e-mail me at donna@bluerootsartstudio.com beforehand to reserve it.

 

 

Water lily painting, and where to hang original art

hang original art water lily
Pink Water lily, 8″x8″, acrylic on canvas, ©2016 Donna Grandin. $250.

Pink water lily

Summer is over, but there are still a few water lilies lingering in ponds here and there. “Pink water lily” is a shot of colour, a bit of cheer as we head into what promises to be a long winter. And since it has been a while since I blogged, I  thought I would write about some alternative spaces to hang original art.

Originally I had this painting in mind for someone specific, I thought they wanted a close up of a water lily, but it turned out it was too bold, too bright to go with my other paintings in their collection. So, now it is available for someone new.

And this got me thinking about the places where people hang original art.

Alternate places to hang original art

Where do you hang your original art? In your office, your cottage, your home? In the front foyer, at the top of the stairs, above the bed, the dining room table and the inevitable couch?

How about in the eat-in kitchen, or the she-shed?

This summer I had the nice surprise of discovering one of my small paintings in the powder room of a collector and friend. Of course, I am not recommending anyone hang original, valuable art in their washroom. The steam from the shower could ruin it over time.

However, I think few of us think of using the powder room as a mini-gallery.

My friend Bridie is an artist, and like many artists, over the years she has collected a few small paintings that she has fallen in love with. Some she acquired in a show of support for a fellow artist, others she may have received as gifts.

However, as an artist herself, wall space is a premium. Home is the one place you are always guaranteed a solo exhibition!

Powder room exhibition

Recently, I popped in for a cup of tea and a chat, and as I went to use the powder room before leaving, I discovered Bridie’s solution.

She hangs a few of the small paintings on the walls of the powder room, rotating and refreshing her selection every now and then.

I already knew that she hung art in there, I always enjoyed stopping in to look at the little treasures, but it was only when one of my own popped up that I realized she changed up the art. And I wondered how many other artists had been in there and discovered their art on display? How many other people looked forward to a trip to her powder room when they came for a visit?

Just think of it. What a great opportunity to curate your own mini-exhibition for your friends and family!

Can you think of any other unusual places  or alternate spaces where you could hang original art?

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Peacock pair – new painting, new story

Peacock pair
Peacock pair, 24″x24″, acrylic on canvas, © 2016 Donna Grandin. $1100.

Peacocks in Toronto

Years ago, I was at the Toronto Zoo with my kids, when we crossed paths with a party of rowdy peacocks. They were rule-breakers, living on the edge, and the Zoo was their turf.

Peacock
Rebel Peacock breaking all of the rules, but deep down he still knew he was a prisoner.

I’m sure this guy was the leader, who became internet-famous when he escaped from the zoo last year & spent days touring Toronto rooftops, inspiring at least one viral video before returning to tell his tale to fellow zoo inhabitants, starting with the bison.

Peacock Pair

Why did he return, you ask?

peacocks
She was born on the wrong side of the tracks, but nothing could keep them apart.

I could say there was a pretty peahen he had to get back to, but a brief Goggle search put me straight. A mature peacock with a train full of fabulous feathers is more likely to have a harem.

And in fact, younger peacocks like this one tend to hang around with other peacocks. Birds of a feather flocking together, caught up in their own good looks.

The peahen on the other hand, sits on its eggs (usually 3-5) for about 28 days, and forms a community with other peahens as they raise the peachicks together, teaching them how to find food etc.

So, the peafowl I painted in Peacock Pair, are more likely to be siblings. Once again, reality bites. I was all set to write a tale of star-crossed peacock lovers who ran away together, determined to mate for life. Truth is, our fine-feathered friend, the Peacock is more of a narcissist, and a polygamist.

peafowl running
The fateful day the Peacock lovers ran away together? Or brother and sister racing each other?

Art in the Park Oakville

See the original painting – Peacock Pair – in person at Art in the Park Oakville on Mon, Aug 1. 10-5pm, and tell me which version of the story you prefer. I will be in booth #143.

There will be more than 175 booths showcasing artists and artisans who work in a variety of media, as well as a licensed food court. The venue is also beautiful, Bronte Heritage Waterfront Park is right on the lake at the foot of Bronte Rd.

If you are over 12yrs, there is a $5. cover which will go towards the Oakville Art Society, which has been putting on this well-organized art fair since 1965.

 

Around 2am this morning I hit the tipping point in this painting where I knew I’ll be able to pull it off (eventually). I don’t often share my WIP unless the painting is already completed, because it goes through such an ugly stage. Even though I’m the one with the brush, I want to be surprised by the outcome, so my painting process can be quite chaotic. Personally, I’ve found that’s the route to the good stuff. Anyway, the quiet was broken by thunder and rain just as endorphins were flooding my system (tipping point = magic) which led to me making this video! Please follow to see the finished painting. #canadianartist #burlington #peacock #artforsale #artstudio #painting #art #wip #magic #creativeprocess #nightowl #artintheparkoakville

A video posted by Donna Grandin Fine Art (@donnagrandin) on

To see some more of the original acrylic paintings I will have at the park, visit my website www.bluerootsartstudio.com.

I will also have some greeting cards. And I can tell you more about the 30 small paintings in 30 days challenge I will be doing in September.

Hope to see you soon, please e-mail me if you have any inquiries!
Donna Grandin
donna@bluerootsartstudio.com

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Floating flowers, painting water lilies

water lilies
Floating flowers, 24″x24″, acrylic on canvas, © 2016 Donna Grandin. Available at Art in the Park Oakville, Aug 1.

Floating flowers

There is something so alluring about water lilies, floating flowers, I think it’s because they’re both obvious and mysterious at the same time.

Most of us don’t have water lilies growing in our gardens, they are not a part of our everyday lives, so it is a delight to spot them – in a pond in a Provincial Park, on a friend’s property, or at a hotel or restaurant.

In this case, my reference photos were taken in the Hendrie Gardens at the Royal Botanical Gardens in Burlington, ON.

By “obvious” I mean predictable, the petals follow a certain pattern. They’re big, brightly coloured, beautiful, but if you’re photographing them, one fully bloomed flower looks much the same as the next.

I think it is because they have stiff petals, so they generally stay in place, unlike the paper-thin petals of hibiscus flowers, which flutter in the wind, or rest uncomfortably when crowded by leaves and branches. There is a serene, time-less beauty about water lilies, whereas hibiscus flowers are active, unpredictable in the slightest breeze – striking one pose after the other, and like paparazzi I click and click in a frenzy. The same flower can yield numerous compositions, invoke a variety of moods for me to paint.

When I zoom in on a water lily (like any other flower), there is a heady hunt for the perfect photo where the bloom fills the frame, and the image is crisp. Whether or not the photo will inspire a painting, there is pleasure in the capture.

Wading in

The thing about water lilies though, is that they are floating flowers. Often they are hard to get close to, unless you’re willing to wade into the pond, and depending on the quality of the camera – or skill of the photographer – that perfect macro photo can be quite elusive.

Once I was photographing a friend’s garden, and seeing my interest, and wearing the right get-up for it, she did go in and pick a white flower for me. We set it up in a bowl of water in the kitchen and I was delighted to be able to get as close as I wanted to, to examine the details, and photograph from any angle.

That was more than a decade ago, and I have yet to do a painting from that photo shoot. I realized that a huge part of the allure of the water lily for me as a painter, is the opportunity to also paint the pond reflections. With the flower, I feel constrained by the predictable contours, but reflections are an invitation to play.

Painting Water Lilies

I have always preferred to paint flowers in situ (so that the environment they have been growing in adds context) rather than isolate them – for example, painting them with a black background. The goal of that style of painting seems to be to paint the ideal version of that flower, or a stereotype, whereas even when I paint a flower realistically (which I’m less and less inclined to do), I tend to let loose in the background.

In fact, I’m probably drawn to confusing, messy backdrops. And it’s not just the pull of abstraction, it’s because I think the imperfections and idiosyncrasies are what help to convey individuality, and therefore authenticity. When I paint a single flower, I approach it as a portrait of that flower.

As you can see by this painting, Floating Flowers, I’m not really going for accuracy in terms of the details, but I’m trying to capture a mood, convey a feeling that the viewer may recognize, and appreciate.

So far, I have not painted a close up of a water lily, instead I’ve chosen to step back a bit, and include some lily pads. Often lily pads are much more chaotic than the water lilies they surround … they’re ripped, overlap each other or curl at the edges. This adds variety & character to a composition.

Possibilities

There really are endless possibilities, even if an artist stuck to one subject, like water lilies. So far I’ve been painting them in the middle ground, with a loose style, but I’ve had a student do a close up of the flower and render it in a much tighter, traditional way. And of course when most people think of water lilies and art, they think of Monet’s big, gestural Impressionist landscapes.

I have not painted a landscape with a pond yet; on a regular sized canvas, the water lilies would just be dots. However as I write, I am getting excited to try a close up of a water lily, but painted in a semi-realistic style, using patterning. The eye loves a mystery, and the artist loves a challenge.

 

 

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Group art exhibition – Be Yoga, Burlington

group art exhibition
Be Yoga & Wellness, Burlington, ON. 4031 Fairview St.

Group Art Exhibition

Recently I was invited by Oakville artist Derik Hawley to display some of my paintings in a group art exhibition at Be Yoga & Wellness in Burlington. I thought it was a great idea, especially when I realized it was at Fairview & Walker’s Line, only a 4min drive from my house!

The nature of the space & format of the show, gave me the opportunity to exhibit a wide variety of subjects – florals, peacock feather-inspired abstracts, and some never-before exhibited experimental abstracts.

abstract art
Abstract painting by Donna Grandin, Be Yoga & Wellness, Burlington, ON

Abstract Art

The painting above – Enduring, 30″x60″ –  was the first thing I painted for 2016, an experiment in abstraction. It sat in a corner of my studio (waiting for me to figure out what to do with it) until I jumped on this chance to show it. As it turns out, I’ve been told by the manager that it is the piece that gets the most comments & compliments!

There is also another abstract painting of mine in the same room, but I’ll leave it for you to discover on your own. It has been hanging in my house since I painted it in 2012, the result of a long, cathartic painting session. Again, although it is an interesting painting, it did not fit into my regular body of work, so I kept it to myself. However, I could not get over the co-incidence that the only text in the painting is “Be” (the title of the painting is “Just be”), and the name of the yoga studio is Be Yoga! So I brought it along on a whim, and it turned out to be a good call.

 

group art exhibition
Acrylic paintings by Donna Grandin, now available at Be Yoga & Wellness in Burlington

The other Artists

Derik is showing some of his lovely digital images in a variety of sizes.  I think they mostly start out as photographs he has taken, but then he manipulates them through computer programs, and the resulting abstract images are mesmerizing. They remind me of stained glass, and kaleidoscopes.

There are also some beautiful black & white images from Oakville photographer Bill Smith. And I saw a wonderful painting of a swimmer in a pool – with an emphasis on light creating patterns on the water- that artist Heather Horton dropped off, it’s probably hanging by now.

Thanks

I’d like to thank Be Yoga & Wellness for showing local art, and manager Kelly Foster and artist Derik Hawley for inviting me to be a part of this ongoing group art exhibition.

If you’re in the area, please drop in during regular open hours and take a look! The address is 4031 Fairview St.,  Unit 103.

All art is available – see labels for details, and purchases may be made through the front desk.

 

Rose Mallow Hibiscus – new painting

rose mallow
Rose Mallow Hibiscus, 20″x16″, acrylic on canvas, © 2016 Donna Grandin. $600.

Rose Mallow Hibiscus is another Spring Flower painting. It is nice to paint local Ontario flowers in season, even though my main interest is in Tropical foliage & flowers.

Before the Grand Opening, I made a couple trips to the new Rock Garden at the RBG in Burlington, to gather inspiration for the main event, where I painted live.

The first day I went, I paid for the guided tour, and then went around with my camera, trying to zero in on a subject for my painting. One plant I thought was interesting, was the Rose Mallow Hibiscus – mainly because from a distance (before reading the name) I thought the flowers looked like pink marshmallows on skewers!

Also, I’ve painted many hibiscus flowers before, but never would have guessed this was a hibiscus, though I do see the resemblance to Rose of Sharon flowers, and I know they are also in the hibiscus family.

Anyway, I started this painting some time ago, holding it as a back-up in case my painting for the big event didn’t work out. As it turned out, by the time I went to the Rock Garden for Luna, the flowers had dried up and most of them had faded away or fallen already. Thankfully, it did not matter, as I ended up doing a plein air painting for Luna.

I think this painting probably ended up quite whimsical because I was envisioning an magical evening in an enchanted garden. There is no underestimating the power of suggestion, in art – this is where we get to go beyond photography (or at least my level of photography), and just play with our own interpretations.

If you are interested in “Rose Mallow Hibiscus”, e-mail me, otherwise, I will exhibit it in Art in the Park Oakville, Aug 1st.

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RBG Rock Garden – live painting at LUNA

Luna RBG Rock Garden
Setting of Luna, opening reception of RBG Rock Garden, Burlington

I had the honour of painting live at Luna, the grand opening celebration of the David Braley & Nancy Gordon Rock Garden on Thurs night.

As a painter of landscape, flowers & foliage, I have long had a membership at the local Royal Botanical Gardens, and have been waiting for almost 3 years for the Rock Garden to re-open, to see how it has been transformed & updated.

So I was thrilled to get the call from Jeremy Freiburger of Cobalt Connects inviting me to be one of three artists painting live.

Here is a description of the sold-out event, from the RBG website:

Screenshot 2016-05-21 15.44.48

There was also a silent auction – as Sanjay B. Patel and Amanda Immurs & I painted, people were able write their bids down on the sheets next to us.

live painting
Donna Grandin painting live at Luna, the opening celebration of the David Braley and Nancy Gordon Rock Garden at the Royal Botanical Gardens in Burlington, ON

Thanks to the gentleman who took this photo of me painting. I was so focused on doing a good job in the time I had, that I forgot to take photos myself, which I regret, because I’d love to show you what the place looked like. You can search #RBGLuna for images online though.

Several people did ask if they could photograph me painting, and there were some video cameras, but I don’t know if I’ll ever get to see their footage. In the photo above I’m calm, but if there is video of the last 20-30min, I probably look like some crazy person with blurry hands and six paintbrushes on the go!

Donna with painting
Donna Grandin with painting she created live at Luna, opening of RBG Rock Garden

It was almost dark by the time I took the painting up to the main building, to where people would pick up the items they’d won at auction.

There were several names on my bid sheet, but I had no idea who they were, because when I looked up from my easel I’d just see a sea of business suits and fancy dresses. Don’t get me wrong, I really enjoyed painting in public, chatting here and there with people who had questions and comments, but I mostly kept my eyes on my painting or my subject, so I didn’t remember too many of the faces.

Luckily after the light show the couple with the winning bid came by to pick up the painting, and they seemed happy with it.

auction painting
Plein air painting done during the LUNA grand re-opening of the RBG Rock Garden

This photo is a little fuzzy, it was taken quickly with my phone, at night, with indoor lights.

I spent a long time laying in the composition, because that is key, but then I was rushing near the end, adding in colour and detail. I can still see areas I’d like to address. But really that’s the difference between a plein air (outdoor) sketch – painted from life, with a time constraint –  and one of my regular paintings which I may spend a week, or two, sometimes longer on, in the studio.

All in all though, I really enjoyed the experience, getting to do what I love to do for a few hours, while lovely people stopped by and complimented my work. I’d certainly welcome the opportunity to do something like this again.

Meanwhile, I have been working on a floral painting from photos taken at the Rock garden when I did the guided tour last week. I will be posting it in the next few days, so look out for it!

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BLUE ROOTS ART STUDIO – acrylic paintings of Caribbean & Canadian landscape, flowers & foliage. Burlington, ON, Canada. 905-639-3419